KPP Board Meeting Agenda (06-11)

Date/Time: Saturday, June 11, 2016 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Location: Kansas State University, Mara Conference room located on 4th floor of Trotter Hall (middle of 3 buildings of the veterinary complex)
Contact person is Nora Schrag 620-755-3500
Click the following link to access the agenda: KPP Board Meeting- June 11th Agenda

A Tribute to Charles Stansifer

Charles Stansifer 1930 – 2016

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Charles Stansifer and Mary Miller

Charlie Stansifer was a native Kansan with an international perspective and a love for Paraguay.  Charlie was born in western Kansas and obtained a bachelors degree from Wichita State University before becoming an expert in the history of Central America.  He spent most of this academic career in multiple positions at the University of Kansas.

It is difficult to describe Charlie’s immense impact on Kansas Paraguay Partners (KPP).  One measure that Charlie might use is that he is mentioned 55 times in the index of Merrill and Boots Raber’s 40-Year History of Kansas-Paraguay Partners.

One of Charlie’s signature achievements was obtaining Kansas Board of Regents and legislative agreement that a limited number of  Paraguayan students could attend Kansas universities as in-state students. As a result more than 1,000 Paraguayans have studied in Kansas. Many obtaining degrees and returning to Paraguay to enhance the development of their country.

Charlie started working on the university exchange in 1976 and the agreement was signed shortly thereafter. The Raber history reports that in 1985 there were only 15 Paraguayan students studying in Kansas. Their was a dramatic increase in the 1990s to over 100 students per year. Today the program has expanded to Washburn University and Johnson County Community College and several universities have increased the number of Paraguayan students that they would accept.

Charlie always say Kansas Paraguay Partners as a two way exchange and he worked tirelessly to encourage Kansas students to study in Paraguay.  This was a difficult task that bore little fruit. In 2005 he pledged $5000 to support a scholarship fund to support Kansas students to study in Paraguay as well as Paraguayans to study in Kansas. KPP undertook to endow a fund to support Charlie’s vision.  Just 10 years later the fund was sufficient to support two $1,500 scholarships each year.  One for a Kansas student and one for a Paraguayan.

Charlie did not limit his KPP involvement to educational exchanges. In 1977 our counterpart Comitè Paraguay Kansas was concerned that while several Paraguayan artist had visited Kansas, no Kansas artists had visited Paraguay.  Charlie met with staff of the Centro Cultural Paraguayo-Americano in Asuncion to promote and co-sponsor Kansas artists to visit Paraguay.  Since then artistic exchanges have been a nearly annual part of the Kansas-Paraguay partnership.

Similarly in 1985 Charlie accompanied Phil Humphrey who was an ornithologist and director of the University of Kansas Natural History Museum to the Paraguayan Chaco.  They identified 80 species of birds. 

Since history was Charlie’s life he also turned this passion to the stories of KPP and Paraguay.   Since KPP is an all volunteer organization with no physical office, it would be easy to loose track of its many accomplishments. Charlie arranged for the Kansas State Historical Society to be the depository for the KPP archives. The archives are available to anyone interested in the history of this great partnership.

Similarly in 1990 visited Paraguay and evaluated the history curriculum at the two major universities as well as the resources of the Paraguay Archives. He found the resources available for historical research to be lacking. Charlie had several important documents regarding Paraguayan history in his extensive personal library.  He donated these to the University of Kansas Library to be available to all scholars. They were also copied and provided to Paraguayan scholars.

Finally, Charlie along with Merrill Raber and Alberto Granada of Paraguay arranged a tour of Paraguay and tour of Peru, Paraguay and Chili. Charlie’s history lectures were an essential part of participants understanding of the places visited. 

Landfill Harmonic to be Featured at Tallgrass Film Festival

Kansas Connection to Oscar Candidate Featured in Tallgrass Film Festival

The story of Landfill Harmonic has built viral anticipation for this documentary that will be featured at Tallgrass Film Festival. Music inspires hope and accomplishment amid poverty and disaster in a story that continues to unfold.

Landfill Harmonic follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura. This Paraguayan musical group is composed of kids living next to one of South America’s largest landfills. The unlikely orchestra plays music with instruments made entirely out of trash. When their story goes viral, the orchestra is catapulted into the global spotlight. With the guidance of their music director, they must navigate this new world of arenas and sold out concerts. However, when a natural disaster devastates their community, the orchestra provides a source of hope for the town. The film is a testament to the transformative power of music and the resilience of the human spirit.

Proposed by Paraguay as its candidate for an Oscar nomination, this heart-warming story has connections to Kansas. The Recycled Orchestra sprung from a project supported by Kansas Paraguay Partners (KPP). KPP members carried donated instruments to Sounds of the Earth, founded in 2002 by Luis Szarán, Paraguayan orchestra director, composer and musical researcher. Both Sounds of the Earth and Recycled Orchestra serve to build educational and social success in children who have very limited resources.

Landfill Harmonic will be shown on Fri, Oct 16, 3:15 PM at the Orpheum Theatre and on Sun, Oct 18, 1:45 PM at the Garvey Theater 1.

The Kansas Paraguay chapter of Partners of the Americas (Partners) has been active since 1968. Partners connect people and organizations across borders to serve and to change lives through lasting friendships. KPP project areas include education, health, cultural arts, emergency preparedness and natural resources.

More details may be found at the following links and contacts.

Landfill Harmonic at the Tallgrass Film Festival

https://kansasparaguaypartners.wordpress.com/ Kansas Paraguay Partners

Ann Burger

ann.burger@hotmail.com

316.213.0012

or

Steve Richards

steve.richards421@outlook.com

316.217.4972

Tallgrass Film Association

Cara Kliewer

carakliewer@gmail.com

316.644.1269

facebook.com/tallgrassfilm

twitter.com/tallgrass

13th annual Tallgrass Film Festival

October 14-18, 2015 in Wichita, Kansas

Comite Paraguay Kansas and Kansas Paraguay Partners are Promoting 4H/4C – Again

I am reprinting (below) an article written by Katie Allen of the Kansas State Extension Service about Deryl Waldren helping Kansas Paraguay Partners (KPP) and Comité Paraguay Kansas (CPK) promote 4H in Paraguay where it is know as 4C.  One advantage of a long term partnership like that of KPP/CPK is the opportunity to revisit opportunities from the past.  In the 1980s Lois Redman and Clara Dubbs took leadership in promoting 4C in Paraguay.  As a result Paraguayan youth attended Kansas State University and Fort Hays State University forging life long friendships. One of my fond memories living in Paraguay for a year was waiting for the bus one morning and a pickup truck pulled over and asked me where I was from.  When I said Kansas the driver replied that he graduated from Fort Hays and he would be happy to take me to the city center.  The driver was Anibal Fanego who at the time was a high level official in the Paraguayan Department of Agriculture.  When KPP took a tour of Paraguay in 2005 Anibal was sure to stop our hotel by and great Lois and Clara as did many other Paraguayans who were hosted by these two KPP leaders.  It is great to see that more of these types of relationship will be forged in the coming years..

Northwest Kan. 4-H specialist focusing on youth program in Paraguay

As part of his trip to revitalize Paraguay’s 4-C program, similar to the 4-H program in the United States, Deryl Waldren participated in several interviews with media, including a live radio interview in Spanish in Limpio, Paraguay.

By KATIE ALLEN
K-State Research and Extension

COLBY – All 4-H members in the United States know what the four Hs represent – head, heart, hands and health. Similar youth programs exist across the globe but are known by other names. In Paraguay, the program is called 4-C, with the Cs standing for cabeza, corazón, capacidad and cooperación. These mean head, heart, capacity and cooperation.

“There has been a strong partnership with Paraguay in Kansas through the Partner of the Americas program,” said Deryl Waldren, 4-H specialist for K-State Research and Extension’s northwest area in Colby. “Kansas and Paraguay were linked up, because they are similar in that both are relatively flat, have no mountains, have good agricultural land and don’t have access to water.”

Waldren completed a two-week trip to Paraguay in August to perform a needs assessment of its 4-C program. The program was started in 1949, he said, and has gone through many changes over the years. Many in the country want to revitalize the program and make it more accessible and relevant for youth throughout the country.

Waldren started by meeting with stakeholders, including some of the country’s top agricultural leaders, and 4-C clubs to observe and answer questions. Among the top areas in which the 4-C clubs wanted to engage members was service learning projects that benefited local communities, such as community gardens.

“A lot of these gardens that I observed were attached to the schools, and that was helping with food security – making sure families have enough to eat,” Waldren said. “If there’s excess food, they were able to sell it to the community and make money for the school or to do more for 4-C.”

Other service projects of interest to 4-C clubs, he said, depended on a local need. One club did some landscaping and beautified a local park to make it a place where kids would want to go. Another club plans to build an athletic field. Another built fishing ponds that will be stocked to grow fish to sell to members of the community. This project also teaches entrepreneurial skills to members.

“We like to see kids learning that they need to give back to the community in community service projects,” Waldren said. “The best way is to look at the local needs and develop a plan or a project that will give back to the community what that community needs.”

“Obviously 4-H around the world is based on local needs, but there are certain things we hope 4-H is teaching, which is life skills through these and other projects,” he added.

Two organizations helped organize Waldren’s meetings in Paraguay, including Committee Paraguay Kansas (Comité Paraguay Kansas or CPK) and the Center for Information and Development of Resources (Centro de Información y Recursos para el Desarrollo or CIRD). CPK is a volunteer organization that promotes development between Paraguay and institutions in Kansas, while CIRD is a non-governmental organization that facilitates programs and grants to develop Paraguay.

The work continues

Waldren, who has also worked in youth development programs in Australia, Asia and Europe, said it’s important to understand other programs similar to 4-H worldwide. The relationships can create great learning opportunities and be mutually beneficial.

Specifically in Paraguay, he hopes more extension staff will join him to meet three proposed goals based on expressed needs. The first is to train extension staff in Paraguay in positive youth development and how to implement more 4-C clubs. The second is to find relevant, succinct curriculum materials they can use within the clubs that could be easily translated to Spanish. The third is to match Kansas 4-H clubs with Paraguay 4-C clubs to increase the exchange of information and help one another.

“We look forward to having more communication to see what their needs are and putting together different ways and more people to help them,” Waldren said.

He added that it’s also important to have representatives from Paraguay visit Kansas to see 4-H in action. Two representatives from CPK will be at the Kansas State Fair on Saturday, Sept. 12, to see 4-H exhibits, meet 4-H members and their families, and visit with 4-H staff as part of an eight-day tour of Kansas.

EL 23 DE SETIEMBRE DE CADA AÑO COMO DÍA DE LA CULTURA AFROPARAGUAYA

On August 7, 2015 Paraguayan President Horatio Cartes signed legislation that establishes September 23 as Afro-Paraguayan Cultural Day.

As an advocate Silvia Diaz de Moore is largely responsible for this legislation and is the International Representative of the Saint Baltazar Traditional Group of Kamba Cua that is one of the Afro-Paraguayan communities. 

Silvia Diaz de Moore

Silvia Diaz de Moore

Silvia Diaz de Moore said that for the Afro-descendant community this achievement puts on the calendar a day that commemorates Afro-descendants.  She explained that September 23 was chosen as the day to commemorate Afro-Paraguayan culture because of the death of Gervasio Artigas.

General José Gervasio Artigas, also known as father of Uruguayan independence, included free slave soldiers (known as los lancercos de Artigas or the lancers of Artigas) in Uruguay’s war of independence from Spain.  Silvia and the Kamba Cua community’s descendants were los lanceros de Artigas, who fought in the war of Uruguayan independence in the early 1800s.  Artigas and his soldiers, including los lanceros de Artigas, received political asylum in Paraguay around 1820, but the Paraguayan dictator at that time, José Gaspar Rodriguez de Francia, would not allow them to mix with the “white” population.”  Francia provided Silvia’s ancestors land and livestock outside of Paraguay’s capital city of Asunción to survive.  Silvia’s Kamba Cua community has lived in that area ever since. Kamba Cua, is Guarani, the native indigenous language of Paraguay, and means “area of the black.”  Silvia’s descendants maintained their African heritage by performing African dance and musical traditions called Candombe.  Silvia and residents of Kamba Cua still practice Candombe and organize a festival every year in their community to celebrate their heritage and culture.  Other Afro-Paraguayan communities are in Paraguari, Emboscada, and Laurelty.  

African inspired Paraguayan Masks

African inspired Paraguayan Masks

Silva is married to Kansas native Shante Moore who graduated from Kansas State University.  Shante participated in a Kansas State community service project in Piribebuy, Paraguay in 1994. Silvia and Shante met in 2000 when he was working as a fellow in the U.S. Embassy in Asuncion. During his fellowship, he worked with Kamba Cua to set up a Kansas State Community Service Project with four students in 2001.  They later married. Shane is currently working in the U.S. Mission to the Organization of American States (OAS).

Economic Progress in Paraguay

Paraguay has a long history of economic activity attributed to corruption and contraband.  Ciudad Del Este is a well known center of such activity.  Now we finally have some good news about progress in this amazing city.  If you have ever been there, you know what I mean.  Ciudad del Este has it all.

http://www.startribune.com/growing-pains-in-paraguay-as-economy-modernizes/307520831/

Paraguayan Art

Kansas Paraguay Partners and Comité Paraguay Kansas have had both visual and performing artist exchanges for most of its existence. Recently there is a special visual arts project between KPP, CPK and the Paraguayan Binational Center (CCPA).  Amber Hansen and Eric Conrad have traveled to Paraguay to judge art contests and we await the visit of Sergio Jara the Paraguayan winner of the sculpture contest.  Paraguayan photographer Teresita Gonzalez has also visited Kansas recently.  All of this is to say that Paraguay has a vibrant visual art tradition.  KPP supporter Arla Jones sent this link to Paraguay’s participation in the Venice Biennale.  Take a look at some great work.

http://theculturetrip.com/south-america/paraguay/articles/paraguay-and-the-south-american-encyclopedic-palace-at-the-venice-biennale/

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